July 26, 2021

Zaika

Livingston

Eight Glasgow delicacies everyone has to try at least once in their lives

5 min read

Stovies, whiskey and Irn Bru may be what most think of when asked about the Glasgow diet.

But talk to any Glaswegian and you might be surprised to hear what we really hanker for.

While traditional dishes are still a staple on many menus across the city, we love nothing more than to try new things – or old favourites with a bit of a twist.

We’re all for bigging up good Scottish cuisine here at Glasgow Live – and we happen to think there’s some amazing Scottish delicacies on offer in our fine city.

From high end scallops to a modern take on traditional Scots porridge, here are some of the dishes we reckon everyone in Glasgow should taste at least once.



Get all the latest updates on restaurants and bars reopening and more from Glasgow sent straight to your inbox every week signing up to our free Food & Drink newsletter.

The email update arrives at around 6pm every Thursday evening and is manually curated by our team, bringing you everything you need to know about the city’s food and drink scene as lockdown starts to ease.

To sign up, simply enter your email address into this link here and select Food And Drink.

Scotch Pies from Old Salty’s

Small but perfectly formed, these are Glasgow’s God-tier snack. Whether you’ve having one at a football match, munching one on the go or sitting down to eat it as part of a slap up meal, the humble Scotch pie never disappoints.

Typically they are filled with minced meat and best served piping hot – but rules are meant to be broken. Our pick? A macaroni pie from Old Salty’s, oozing with gooey mac and cheese and enveloped in perfectly crispy pastry.

Scottish Porridge in the west end

The best way to start your day. Every Glaswegian worth their salt knows that traditional Scottish porridge isn’t made with sugar. Traditionally it is a savoury breakfast rather than a sweet one, made by cooking oats in milk with salt. Warm yer cockles with Papercup’s delicious take on the classic.

The dish has been given a modern twist at this west end eatery: creamy oats stacked with salted coconut, soy yoghurt and strawberry compote topped with granola, cacao nibs and agave. A wee bit more indulgent than your mammy made it, but certainly still worth getting out of bed for.

Another west end spot doing the Scottish breakfast bowl proud is Zique. They make it like all the trendy kids do these days, soaking the oats overnight and adding basra date syrup.

Haggis from The Haggis House

It doesn’t get more Scottish than this does it? Our national dish may not be for faint hearted foreigners, but we can’t get enough of the stuff, despite being fully aware it is made from the innards of a sheep.



Haggis fritters with creamy peppercorn sauce

The Haggis House specialises in Haggis, unafraid to put the Scottish classic front and centre of their new venture, which launched this year. Father and daughter duo Jav and Sophie are serving up tasty Scottish snacks from the south side of the city including delicious-looking haggis balls and fritters and the homemade haggis treats can even be made fully veggie, with all orders available from collection.

Their signature peppercorn sauce makes it even better, trust us.

Tablet ice cream at Loop and Scoop

Another west end favourite, Loop and Scoop is one of those institutions that we could never live without.

Beloved of Glasgow Uni students and foodies alike, this ice cream parlour is always heaving with queues often snaking out the door on a sunny day. It’s the best in the west end, possibly the best in town, and many a Glaswegian’s go-to for a naughty but nice treat.




In short, it’s a bit of a fancy place in which to enjoy ice cream and churros. You can take away as well – and don’t forget some to order the tablet ice cream for a delicious take on the Scottish sweet treat.

Black Pudding with scallops at The Bothy

Posh Scots nosh done right.

Yes, we’re going a bit high end with this one, but it’s for a good reason. You can’t beat a bit of Stornoway and scallops fresh off the boat from the Isle of Barra – and the ones served in The Bothy are top notch.

There’s a reason this place has been named one of the best seafood spots in Glasgow for years, and their menu is always stuffed with high quality Scottish produce and fresh takes on traditional dishes. These scallops are hard to beat.

Deep fried Mars Bar at Maggie May’s

Invented in Aberdeen in 1992 and eaten almost exclusively by wide-eyed and empty-bellied tourists, we can forgive you for rolling your eyes at the suggestion this is a Glaswegian delicacy.

Still, once in a while we don’t mind buying into a stereotype, particularly when it involves this much gooey caramel and chocolate. Maggie May’s do it best, served up with vanilla ice cream and cutlery – so you don’t have to feel too scummy as you make your way through a week’s worth of calories.

Cranachanat Minted

Minted in the West End sell cranachan brownies and best believe these decadent desserts are a new Glasgow classic.

Cranachan brownies are a fun spin on a traditional Scottish treat often served around Christmas time – but when baking tastes this good, you’ll want to eat it all year round. For a more traditional take, head to the top of Princes Square for a sample of the classic sweet dish.



Delicious aspberry cranachan at Minted

Made with whipped cream, scotch whisky, honey, oatmeal, and fresh raspberries, this is the dessert of true patriots, not to mention the best name for a dish ever.

Cullen skink at Babbity Bowster

It may have been created in the northeast of Scotland, but you don’t get much more Glasgow slurping on a Cullen skink at Babbity Bowster.

Their version of the creamy smoked fish soup is well kent throughout the city and for good reason.

Flaky smoked haddock, luxurious cream, and silky potatoes and onions, this will always be one of Glasgow’s top delicacies. Soups don’t get much more Scottish than this.

zaikalivingston.co.uk © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.